Name the Murmur Quiz

Heart Murmur Quiz

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Question 1

When you place your stethoscope on your patient you hear  an early to mid systolic murmur in the pulmonic area with a fixed wide split S2 sound. What is the most likely diagnosis?

A
Pulmonary stenosis
B
Pulmonary valve regurgitation
C
Atrial septal defect
D
Ventricular septal defect
Question 1 Explanation: 
Fixed wide S2 splitting should immediately make you think about atrial septal defects.
Question 2

While listening to the heart sounds of a premature infant you hear a continuous machine-like murmur. What is the most likely cause of this murmur?

A
Mitral valve regurgitation
B
Early closure of the foramen ovale
C
Patent ductus arteriosus
D
Tetrology of Fallot
E
Ventricular Septal Defect
Question 2 Explanation: 
A Patent Ductus Arteriosus (PDA) is classically described as a "continuous machine-like murmur." PDAs are associated with prematurity and congenital rubella infections. A Ventricular Septal Defect (VSD) is a harsh sounding murmur, but it is not continuous. VSDs are holosystolic sounds.
Question 3

Which of these could be an opening snap that becomes louder with inspiration?

A
Pulmonary stenosis
B
Mitral stenosis
C
Aortic stenosis
D
Tricuspid stenosis
Question 3 Explanation: 
Both Tricuspid stenosis and Mitral stenosis are described as "opening snap" sounds. If a heart sound gets louder on inhalation, this is a clue that the sound is coming from the right side of the heart; therefore, tricuspid stenosis is more likely the answer in this scenario.
Question 4

This murmur is heard along the 3rd, 4th, and 5th intercostal spaces on the left side. The sound is holosystolic, harsh, and high  pitched. The sound can radiate widely. It can be loud and may have a thrill. What is the most likely cause of this murmur sound?

A
Ventricular septal defect
B
Mitral stenosis
C
Tricuspid stenosis
D
Mitral valve prolapse
Question 4 Explanation: 
Ventricular septal defect is the only holosystolic (pansystolic) murmur in the answer set.
Question 5

Which murmur is often described as a late systolic crescendo with a mid-systolic click?

A
Aortic stenosis
B
Aortic insufficiency
C
Mitral valve prolapse
D
Mitral valve stenosis
E
Aortic regurgitation
Question 5 Explanation: 
Mitral valve prolapse has a late systolic crescendo with a mid-systolic click. The sound of the mid-systolic click is created by the sudden tightening of the chordae tendineae in the left ventricle.
Question 6

This is a harsh holosystolic murmur that is found at the apex. The murmur has a medium to high pitch sound. The sound of the murmur does not get louder with inspiration. The sound can radiate to the left axilla and sometimes the left sternal boarder. What is the most likely murmur?

A
Aortic stenosis
B
Mitral valve regurgitation
C
Ventricular septal defect
D
Tricuspid regurgitation
Question 6 Explanation: 
Always pay attention to locations. Both Mitral valve and Tricuspid valve regurgitation are holosystolic murmurs, but the sound being loudest at the apex and radiating to the axilla are great clues for Mitral valve regurgitation.
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